Sep 262019
 

By Walter Boomsma  (webmasteratmainestategrangedotorg)  , MSG Communications Director

Communication Shorts are brief (short) but important items posted for your information and use, including Degree Days and Officer Installations.

Fifth Degree, York Pomona — DATE CORRECTION

Please note that the correct date for this Fifth Degree Conferral is October 10. 2019, Thursday at York Pomona, Baugneg Beg Grange. Contact?Vicki Huff?for more information.

State Convention Clarification

Because a date didn’t get changed on the Conferences Page, there has been some confusion. To clarify, there is no Ag Luncheon planned as part of this year’s convention.

Conferences and Dates

If you’re like me, planning far ahead is critical! I’ve been pulling dates out of Program Books and starting to build the list of conferences and dates for 2020. Please help with this… if you have state-wide or regional events scheduled (including degree conferrals) please send the information along! If something doesn’t look right, let me know!

Bulletin Reminder

As a reminder, columns and news items for the monthly printed Bulletin are due by the fifteenth of the month. Columns and news items for the website can be submitted at any time. A Bulletin is planned for October and the deadline (October 15) remains. Due to State Convention, it may not be mailed to Granges until later in the month but will be available on the website.

Note that when you subscribe to the Maine State Grange Website we do not share your email address with others and only use it to send you–at the most–one email per day when new information is posted.

Sep 252019
 

By Walter Boomsma  (webmasteratmainestategrangedotorg)  , MSG Communications Director

Communication Shorts are brief (short) but important items posted for your information and use, including Degree Days and Officer Installations.

Degree Day, Cumberland Pomona

Don’t forget that September 28, 2019, is Cumberland Pomona Degree Day?at White Rock Grange. Contact Dave Gowen (536-0038) for more information.

Fifth Degree, York Pomona

October 12, 2019, marks a Fifth Degree Conferral?at York Pomona, Baugneg Beg Grange. Contact?Vicki Huff?for more information.

Program Books Are Available Now!

Many Program Books for 2019-20 have been posted to the site including Communications, Community Service, CWA, Juniors, Website, and Youth. There are still a few items remaining; they will be posted when received. I am also adding a clickable email link at the top of each section of the Program Books and Information Page. If you click on the responsible person’s name, an email to that person will open. Improving communication is always our goal!

Conferences and Dates

If you’re like me, planning far ahead is critical! I’ve been pulling dates out of Program Books and starting to build the list of conferences and dates for 2020. Please help with this… if you have state-wide or regional events scheduled (including degree conferrals) please send the information along!

Communication Tip

Commas can be important… as evidenced by the recent announcement on Facebook by someone who said his favorite things are eating family and leaving out commas.

Website News

I can’t resist reporting that one of our top referrers (websites from which folks click through to visit the Maine State Grange Website) is one of our own Granges! Congratulations to Halcyon Grange for having a great website that generates traffic and interest… and subsequently brings people to the Maine State Grange website.

Bulletin Reminder

As a reminder, columns and news items for the monthly printed Bulletin are due by the fifteenth of the month. Columns and news items for the website can be submitted at any time.

Note that when you subscribe to the Maine State Grange Website we do not share your email address with others and only use it to send you–at the most–one email per day when new information is posted.

Sep 222019
 
Merriconeag Grange #425

The Belvedere Fund of the Maine Community Foundation recently awarded $10,415 to Harpswell’s Merriconeag Grange #425 in through the Maine Grange Foundation for structural repairs. These will include re-coating the roof, repairing damaged interior flooring and sills, fixing the balustrades and trim, and repairing sections of siding. The Belvedere Fund cited the importance of the Merriconeag Grange #425 as a community gathering place and noted its acceptance earlier this year on the National Register of Historic Places as factors in its decision.

Of the 588 Granges that have been chartered in Maine, Harpswell is one of the few in continuous operation. For over a hundred years, the Merriconeag Grange #425 has supported agricultural education and has hosted a wide variety of events including town voting, school graduations, social events, family reunions, receptions and community suppers. The John Leo Murray American Legion Post 171 meets at the Grange, and for the past three years, Harpswell Aging at Home has served a monthly lunch to all Harpswell residents in the fall, winter, and spring.? On the first Saturday of every month, the Grange serves a community breakfast that has been popular with residents and visitors alike.

Sam “Chuck” Alexander, Master of the Grange said that work will begin late this month on the roof.? “We are pleased by the Belvedere Fund’s grant, and we hope that other community members will also contribute to complete the needed repairs to keep this Grange structurally sound and inviting for the next generation.”? The privately funded Belvedere Historic Preservation program invests in the preservation, restoration, and retrofitting of historic buildings in Maine. Grants from this fund focus on capital investments in historic buildings that serve as civic, cultural, or economic hubs for communities. This year of the 52 applications, 25 were awarded a total of $335,479.? The grant application was written by Grange Overseer John Ott and his wife Lili Ott with input from Grange members Shirley Thompson, Sam Alexander, Chuck Alexander, and Ned Pierce and Maine Grange Foundation President Sherry Harriman, Sharon Morton, and Grange Treasurer Vicki Huff. Harpswell selectmen wrote a letter of support this spring for the National Register nomination noting that “Merriconeag Grange is a highly visible local landmark that has graced its Harpswell Neck location for many years … the building is integral to Harpswell’s heritage and Maine’s heritage”.? For further information on how to help with completing the siding repairs and painting of the exterior, please call Sam Alexander at 207-729-8842

Sep 182019
 

By Walter Boomsma  (webmasteratmainestategrangedotorg)  , MSG Communications Director

Communication Shorts are brief (short) but important items posted for your information and use, including Degree Days and Officer Installations.

Website Performance–Nice change!

I’m making a change I think you’re really going to like! When monthly columns are submitted, I’m adding an email link to the author’s name. You’ll recognize this by the fact the name is green. That means you can simply click on that name to send him or her an email. If you reply to a post, that reply comes to me and I have to forward it. Don’t forget you can also comment on a post by clicking on the link it the top right corner. (See highlighted example below.)

Click the name to email the person, click “Responses” to post a comment that everyone can see. Note that comments are moderated and may not appear immediately.

Annual Reports Received

Annual Reports are an important aspect of our Maine State Grange Convention in that they include a summary of activities and accomplishments. We’ve been posting those we’ve received on the Program Books and Information Page.

Program Books Are Coming Soon!

Program Books for 2019-20 were due at MSG Headquarter by September 15, 2019, and will be posted to the website soon. I will also be doing the annual “clean up” and purging of the Program Books and Information page. If there is any older information you need or want, please download it now as it may soon disappear! Officers, directors, and committee chairs, please check the section you are responsible for! I am also adding a clickable email link at the top of each section of this page. If you click on the responsible person’s name, an email to that person will open. Improving communication is always our goal!

Harraseeket Grange Seeks Vendors

Harraseeket Grange in Freeport is still looking for vendors during their Farmer and Makers Market on September 28, 2019. Visit their Facebook Page for more information.

Congratulations, Dave Gowen!

The latest issue of our National Grange Magazine, Good Day!? is arriving in mailboxes… and it includes Dave’s article and photos “Granges Lost to the Quabbin Reservoir.” Remember, you saw it here first! Congratulations to Dave for his work receiving national recognition!

Amazon Smile Makes Us Smile!

You probably don’t want to be reminded that shopping season is fast approaching. Don’t forget that if you are an Amazon Shopper you can use the Amazon Smiles Program and Amazon will make a donation to the Maine Grange Foundation on your behalf.

Bulletin Reminder

As a reminder, columns and news items for the monthly printed Bulletin are due by the fifteenth of the month. Columns and news items for the website can be submitted at any time.

Note that when you subscribe to the Maine State Grange Website we do not share your email address with others and only use it to send you–at the most–one email per day when new information is posted.

Sep 172019
 

By Margaret Henderson  (mlhenderson505atgmaildotcom)  , Director
Committee on Women’s Activities

Happy fall everyone! The leaves are already starting to change color here in Waldo county.

The CWA conference went well. Thank you to all that entered these contests. There were many great entries. The judges were from A.C Moore and were pleased to be asked to do this and will be happy to do this again if they are asked.

State Grange Convention will be here soon. If anyone would like to make fudge for the CWA table It would be greatly appreciated. We will also accept books, knickknacks, etc. to sell as well. The money earned at our table will be used for prize money for next year‘s contests. Thank you in advance for supporting us.

Sep 162019
 
Walter Boomsma

By Walter Boomsma  (webmasteratmainestategrangedotorg)  , Communications Director

I hope you read my annual report! It’s been an exciting year of challenges and accomplishments. One accomplishment I’ll mention here is that we have a new Communications Handbook. This year it includes a list of daily and weekly newspapers with what contact information I could readily find. Sending your event announcements and news items to newspapers in your area will keep folks interested in your Grange. I’ve also updated the Website Handbook. Both will be posted on the Program Books and Information Page of the website very soon.

By the way, I am posting all annual reports and program books to the website as I receive them. This makes them available to everyone. Ideally, all new information is posted by State Convention so you can get started on next year’s contests and suggestions.

I cannot resist sharing a project that I have in the works. My enthusiasm for and commitment to the Words for Thirds Dictionary Program is certainly no secret. Using the resources of Abbot Village Press I hope to release a “Words for Thirds Project Handbook” this fall. Much of the information will be useful to any organization but the examples will be Grange-specific, including a bit of a script explaining how to use the Grange Staves as part of a Dictionary Day visit. There will be strategies for introducing a program in local schools and how to maximize potential media interest. If you are interested in reviewing a complimentary advance copy, let me know!

One of the fun things I get to do as communications director is to connect people. I recently had the honor of connecting Toby Martin of the WindowDressers organization with National Grange Communications Director Amanda Brozana Rio. Toby wrote a wonderful article detailing the involvement of three Granges in the program: Fairfield, St. George, and Vassalboro. (Halcyon Grange has also been involved in the past.) Having learned about these exciting Granges and Grangers, National Grange is exploring a follow-up article, in part to encourage other New England Granges to consider a program. The Granges who are involved report lots of community support and participation! For more information about the WindowDressers Program or to read the entire article, visit windowdresssers.org. Thanks to WindowDressers for reporting on the Grange’s involvement and for a program that truly is about “people helping people.”

In conjunction with the State Convention, annual reports, and program books, the website undergoes some purging and cleaning as we delete old information and replace it with new. If you visit the “Program Books and Information Page” during the next month or so, be prepared and watch dates so you don’t use outdated information or last year’s Program Books. I’ll try to keep things clear and organized! If you see something that needs fixing or clarifying, please let me know!

As noted in my annual report, I believe the primary role of any state position or function is to support Subordinate and Pomona Granges. But communication is not a “one-person job.” Individuals, Community/Subordinate and Pomona Granges can best support our communications efforts by providing positive news and information. Keep sending in your stuff and if there’s some way I can help you communicate and promote, let me know!

Sep 152019
 

Meandering Around the Grange Way of Life with Walter Boomsma

If you don’t hear crying, the Grange is dying!

Okay, I’ll confess I “stole” and adapted that quote from a church brochure. Partly because I love kids but also because I think we need to remember that when we think about the “Grange Way of Life.” Janice and I recently had the opportunity to attend an exciting and fun Grange Event at Halcyon Grange. We drove the long drive in part because of the program but having visited Halcyon in the past, we knew we’d feel welcomed and at home. We didn’t hear any crying but we did have the good fortune to sit behind two young ladies: one who recently started pre-k and another who is, as I recall, in third grade. They both were quick to introduce themselves and we had time to chat about several different topics before the program started. The younger and I seemed to connect quite well and when she became bored with the program, she would often turn to wink and whisper. She was truly an engaging young lady.

During the break, the woman sitting next to me commented to the effect that we were a wonderful family and that my grandchildren were very polite and well-behaved. She was quite surprised when I admitted that we had just met for the first time. I confess I kinda liked the idea of the mistake. Not only because they were cute and great kids but because we were in a Grange Hall at a Grange Function. I like to think we were modeling the fact that as a fraternal organization we often call each other “brothers and sisters.” Clearly, I’m too old to be the brother and sister of a four-year-old and nine-year-old, at least in the biological sense. But it’s also not just about biology.

Perhaps ironically, I’d been thinking I would write about the Grange Declaration of Purposes in my next Exploring Traditions Column. One of the specific objectives begins,

“We propose meeting together, talking together, working together, and in general, acting together for our mutual protection and advancement. We shall constantly strive to secure harmony, goodwill, and brotherhood…”

So on that night in Blue Hill, that objective was achieved, at least in part! But, as the saying goes, wait, there’s more! That objective in our Declaration goes in to say “…, and to make our Order perpetual.” I never did get a chance to discover if my new friend’s mom and dad were members of Halcyon—and in a sense, it didn’t matter. There was plenty of harmony (both musical and personal), goodwill, and brotherhood in the hall that evening. When people—even little people—experience that, they are going to want more. When people want more of what the Grange has to offer, there’s some insurance of perpetuity. It’s not great poetry but

“When you hear giggling, the Grange is sizzling!”

There’s a sweet irony in the fact that Heather Retberg wrote about the same Grange event in “View from the Farm” this month. She mentions a song that was played at the event—unfortunately, I can’t remember all the lyrics but part of it is: “It’s just a drop in the bucket ’til the bucket fills up…” (Read Heather’s Column to find out what happens after the bucket fills up!)

We do well when we consider that “small things” that happen in our lives—chance meetings, a giggling child—may seem like a drop in the bucket at first. As our buckets (and our lives) fill up all of those small things become absorbed but as they do, they become even more important.

The small things that happen in our Granges, at our meetings, may seem like a drop in the bucket. But those drops are no less part of our Grange than what we often think of as the “big” things. And they are no less important.

I often say that sometimes we need to be reminded that little people are still people. They are not so unlike us bigger people. They may cry easier, but if we don’t occasionally hear them crying our Grange may be dying.

If we want to “fill up” our halls and our Granges, maybe we just need to start putting more drops in the bucket. Little people, little things… small contributions of time, energy and money. They’ll seem like drops in the bucket, but the bucket will be filling up.


Any degree or ritual quotations are from the forty-sixth edition of the 2013 Subordinate Grange Manual or the most recent edition of the Pomona Grange Manual. The views and opinions expressed in “Exploring Traditions” are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official doctrine and policy of the Grange. Information about the book “Exploring Traditions—Celebrating the Grange Way of Life” can be found at Abbot Village Press, on Amazon, or by contacting the author  (walteratboomsmaonlinedotcom)  .

Sep 152019
 

By Heather Retberg, Quills End Farm

The moon is waxing toward full Harvest moon and the days are waning toward dark supper-times.  The farm made it through the first week with the two most junior farmers back to school.  You might laugh, but those few hours of daylight lost coupled with the young Quill’s Endians back-to-school has us all feeling that crisp, cooler air with relief and…wonder.  Wondering how we will get it all done with winds and cold times coming.  Wandering amidst the trees and stones with goats, wondering how the day is going now that our rhythms are syncing in different places. This parent farmer can’t help but wonder where the time went between milkings and makings and how did they grow so capable and reliable?  I wonder at the goldenrod and asters with bees (four types!) busy at work and what this year will hold for our young farmer scholars beyond the farm into the wider world once again.  Already there are random questions interjected into milking times.  While bottling milk: “Mama, how would you compare the life of women in ancient Mesopotamia with women in ancient Egypt?”  Just wondering.  And, on entry into the house before all else, there is a plant very near my nose: “What’s this one?” as Ben continues his own plant inventory of the upper fields documenting the changes in pasture species under new grazing methods.   And, just wondering: “How does one reflect on Pocahontas the movie and the reality of 1607 in colonial Virginia?”  Time to turn off the cream separator and think a bit. Rinse the milking pails and think on essential questions that lead to good answers.  Rustle the cobwebs–fall is here and life is changing.

One strand at a time, the web is woven, imperceptibly, but it’s there, rugged and ready.  When we walked these fields with little legs beside,  I often felt that we weren’t doing the ‘real’ work of the day.  I wondered if there was enough ‘book time’.  I still wonder that.  Was there too much work of the day and not enough work of the mind?  But, then, here they are still bringing the work of the day inside and turning the art of farming into the science of observation and documentation.    

We went to a concert at Halcyon, our local Grange, over the weekend–the kind of music that finds your heart before it greets your head.  Four Shillings Short, as if on a finely tuned wavelength, opened with the song ‘A Drop in the Bucket’.  Seven years ago, when first I heard them play, they sang that song and it brought tears to my tired eyes and helped fuel my weary heart as we were (unbeknownst to us) at but the beginning of the decade long fight for recognition of food sovereignty in Maine.  The state had sued a one cow farm, ‘Farmer Brown’ of Blue Hill, but really they had taken on the local laws we’d drafted and 5 towns had adopted.  If they beat Farmer Brown in court, they’d stop the spread of food sovereignty in Maine, too.  People wouldn’t try to pass local laws to keep control of our food.  It all seemed rather a big behemoth, and we had just a few small stones in our back pocket and weren’t too sure how to use the slingshot.  I met good friend Pat with her children and we went to see Four Shillings Short at the library.  Christy and Aodh Og sang:  “…a drop in the bucket, bucket fills the pond, pond fills the river and the river rushes on.  The river meets the ocean and the ocean can’t be stopped, what becomes the mighty ocean started as a drop…”  And, then, I knew what there was to do.  There was just to go ahead and drip, drop, drip, drop.  Water rushes on.  That image and those principles became a fabric of the fight. Water finds its way.

Now, seven years later, when the same sweet voices opened with that song in our Grange hall, I filled right up all over again.  If I had doubted David could slay Goliath, or that farmers and our patrons could de-centralize rule-making away from corporate power, I have certainly doubted that in the midst of farming and the uphill battles for food sovereignty there was enough book work in daytime hours for our farm children.  But the mighty ocean started as a drop!  One strand of spider silk at a time a web is made.  One drop of water at a time oceans form.  One daily effort at a time wonder becomes an education.  This time that song was a reminder at a not so tender time (that spot grew tough) that people working together and sticking to the work and each other can do great things.  We did that. If we did that in one realm, we can do it in others, too.  And this time, as the Harvest moon waxes toward full, a drop in the bucket was a melody balm that these junior farmers will rush right on, too, into scholarship and more wondering, questing, growing.  


Heather and Phil Retberg together with their three children run Quill’s End Farm, a 105-acre property in Penobscot that they bought in 2004. They use rotational grazing on their fifteen open acres and are renovating thirty more acres from woods to pasture to increase grazing for their pigs, grass-fed cattle, lambs, laying hens, and goats. Heather is Master of Halcyon Grange #345 and writes a newsletter for their farm’s buying club of farmers in her area and has generously given us permission to share some of her columns with Grangers. Visit the Quill’s End Farm Facebook Page for more information.

Sep 152019
 

By Rick Grotton,
Membership Committee Member

Northeast Lecturer’s Conference was a success and some of the workshops were geared towards membership gains. The theme was “Down on the Farm.” Writing press releases and learning to use technology to make web pages, how to use the correct language and content, copyright issues, and how to make your pages and releases appealing was stressed. This is a great way to attract and keep youth in our Granges. They are our future and their knowledge of computers will be beneficial for the future of the Grange. Many thanks to our State Lecturer, Margaret Morse for her involvement in making the conference a success. Please support her by participating in the contests and planning fulfilling lecturer programs.

It was wonderful and exciting to see a Junior Grange fair exhibit at some of our agricultural fairs. Thanks to our Junior Co-Directors, Marilyn Stinson and Kathy Gowen and committee for their hard work and devotion to enhance our Junior program. Please support them in their efforts.

It does scare me and I am somewhat disappointed that the Degree day planned for August 24th at Victor Grange had to be canceled due to lack of members needed to perform the parts. Granted the date was not the best time; many of us were busy with our own events throughout the state. it was  NOT a last-minute decision; numerous times the request for help was published. However, it is disappointing that a handful of members could not have been there to pick up a book and read parts for a couple of hours. What is happening to us? Membership is our lifeblood and future. If we don’t have the cooperation of our membership to confer degrees, how will be able to induct new members? Mainly, what are these prospective new members thinking? Will they want to be members now? If you were one of them how would you feel? Roger and Wanda are devoted, passionate Grangers and have been there to always help when needed but they received little help in this important endeavor after repeated attempts to get some help. Let’s use this misfortunate occurrence as a learning experience. We need to help one another regardless of title or office. Keep on the lookout for upcoming degree days; support and help!

There have been no responses to my inquiry about sharing your success stories on membership. This too scares me. It is very difficult to write a column with enthusiasm when you don’t know if anyone is actually reading the column or taking it seriously. For those who know me, I am not one to inflict much, if any, negativity in my columns or to talk negatively about our beloved organization. In this case, however, I feel the need to express my feelings (even if they are on the negative side) concerning membership matters. There are many good things going on everywhere and more visibility from Granges so let’s keep up this great work and thank you for the involvement and devotion of our Brother and Sister Grangers.

Sep 102019
 

By Marilyn Stinson and Kathy Gowen, Co-directors

The Junior Committee is psyched!? Bangor Grange is coming to our rescue. Because Juniors are so stretched out across the state and most of them are from the Augusta area and below, we are having a Fall Meeting – Let’s Grow Juniors’ – in Bangor. It is only a two-hour trip from the west, down east and south (well, Westbrook is another hour) of this great state! Not a six-hour drive for anyone.

This has been shared in our monthly newsletter, but the time is getting close and we’ve had no response except from Alexander Grange so I’m putting out a plea!

Because of our blue ribbon prize money from Windsor Fair, we can treat everyone to the day. Kids and adults, Grangers and friends, so please plan to join us. Take your children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and neighbors of all ages and enjoy the day. Don’t drive? Call someone for a ride! We are family and help one another!

On Saturday, September 14, 2019, Juniors and prospective Juniors will meet at Cole’s Transportation Museum, 405 Perry Road, Bangor, at 9:30.? That’s AM. Don’t worry if you have to be a little late. Fun for kids and adults; check them out on the web or on Facebook.

11:00ish, we will have a KFC picnic lunch and then meet upstairs at Bangor Grange Hall, 1192 Ohio Street, Bangor. They will be having a flea market downstairs, but there is plenty of parking space.

We have a Plus 1 member at Alexander Grange and he can sign when we salute the flag. Then I hope we will have some new members to induct and present Bob with whatever badges he has earned.  Please plan to go and support our kids.  

Juniors! Please wear your sashes or collars and your badges. Our motto is ‘Improvement’ and we want to improve our membership and attendance!

We are excited to see everyone!

试看120分钟做受小视频_国内精品久久久久影院_久久电影